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20091101
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
're not big enough. this is a united states senator so even though we're friends, we're close, we're brothers in christ, we need power to confront this. senator tom coburn. the hit man. >> reporter: senator tom coburn of oklahoma is one of the most influential conservative voices in the united states senate and also a c street resident. marchton said on valentine's day the c street leadership and senator coburn helped him confronts senator ensign. >> tom really kind of takes the helm. >> reporter: so how angry is tom coburn at this point? >> oh, he's smoking. he's one upset man. and then john kind of breaks down a little bit. i don't know what to say. i made a mistake. i really screwed up. >> reporter: hampton provided us with this letter which he says the group of c street forced him to wright to sinsddy. i used you for my own pressure, he wrote. god never intendsed for us to do this. according to hampton, within hours, john ensign calls sinsddy. >> he is just lived. he made him write a letter, but it's not how i feel. doug has exposed me. as though somehow i'm the bad guy in this. >> report
's largest military base in the united states. ft. hood, texas. >> attention. seek shelter immediately. >> reporter: the shots were at close range. fired by a trained military officer with deadly accuracy. with two handguns, the shooter killed 12 and injured 31. >> it's a terrible tragedy, stunning. and as i say, as i've gone around to the hospital here, as i've been at the scene, soldiers and family members and many the great civilians who work here are absolutely devastated. >> reporter: the victim, most of them soldiers, were unarmed, unable to defend themselves. a responding police officer finally opened fire. she injured the suspect and silenced the shooting. [ sirens ] victims were rushed to hospitals across central texas. and overrun emergency rooms pleaded for blood donations. there were rumors of other shooters. the entire base was put on lockdown. children at the bases nine schools were kept inside. their anxious parents gathered immediately at the front gate. >> it's really disheartening. you know something's going on and you can't get to your child. >> it's very, very stres
. >>> porn >>> pornography is a billion dollar business in the united states, an addiction for many. a license to print money for the porn moguls, and a very risky business for the performers. sexuality transmanipulated diseases are a fact of life for those who appear in adult films. a risk that was underscored in june by one actor's hiv infection. but as "nightline" contributor lisa ling found, don't expect condoms to be the answer to this okccupational health hazard. >> reporter: how many women were you having sex with at the height of your career? >> maybe ten women nonstop. you work from 8:00 in the morning to maybe 8:00 at night. and that's one scene. >> reporter: it was all part of a job darren did successfully for nearly eight years. until 2004, when darren got the call all porn performers dread. >>> get that call, everything stops. i have the virus. and my whole world just crashed. >> reporter: so you don't know how you got infected. >> i don't. >> reporter: did you infect people? >> three girls and i knew them. i felt bad. >> reporter: darren's infection shut down southern
into the united states to be used for everything from medicine to causing a person bad luck. there was a 14-pound elephant tooth for sale and the entire face of a rare primate for thousands of dollars. >> we learned what some of the products were purported to be. packaged like this, with no label, but a screw top. tried. >> reporter: why would they sell that? >> it's used for medicine. >> reporter: traditional medicines drive the demand for many endangered animals on the black market. a problem you can't just see by looking, as we found, with agent o'connor. >> reporte >> we're interested in knowing if the products are made with protected wildlife. >> reporter: how do you know? it seems impossible to tell. >> it's difficult when it's packaged like this. >> reporter: tracing an endangered animal from a bottle of medicine or the skin on a pair of boots is extraordinarily complex. but it is exactly what agents do every day at the nation's only wildlife forensics lab in southern oregon. >> i have a skin with no head and the feet are turned inside out and dried. i have to come up with what this was. n
that calls on all to wage war against the united states. >> the key is aulaqi or no. this is something they think about doing and they join in and encourage you and basically help you rationalize your behavior. >> reporter: before he moved to yemen, aulaqi was one of the imams at this church in falls church, virginia. hasan attended here, so, too, did two of the 9/11 hijackers. one of the current imams says aulaqi knew how to relate to young americans. >> they wanted somebody who knew about american culture, the american idiom who could relate to young people. a person who was even witty. >> reporter: officials say the army match had between 10 and 12 contacts with aulaqi early last year. these are some produced on the web that seemed to glorify violence and martyrdom. >> many could not understand the motivation behind gee ham. they don't present it and until this day, they don't understand. they fail to see that it is for the sake of allah, the person who is dying is dying for the sake of allah. doing it for something greater. >> reporter: the army major's messages supposedly included
there's 386,000 registered sex offenders in the united states. two-thirds of america's sex offenders are not in jails and prisons, they are in our community. and the system that we have to do monitoring, supervision, follow-up, once they return to the community, is just overwhelmed. >> reporter: tonight, authorities identified the first victim. her name is tonya carmichael. she was 52 years old. >> at least i know where she is now, and i can put her to rest. she's with god. >> i wish for him to have a not so easy way to hell, that's how i feel. because even that's lenient. >> reporter: tomorrow the police are expanding their search, taking abandoned houses in a half mile radius. they hope they don't find more bodies i'm pierre thomas for ""nightline" "night in cleveland. thanks to pierre thomas for that strong report. when we come back we'll shift gears entirely and thankfully. we'll tell but a man who rose from grim circumstances to become a mogul, dan harris, profiles 50 cent. jeep. ♪ knowing that, every day i have a choice to make. between watching the cloc
. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. >> reporter: shortly before 2:00, president obama walked slowly to the stage to offer words of solace to a wounded nation. >> your loved ones endure through the life of our nation. their memory will be honored in the places they lived and by the people they touched. every evening that the sun sets on a tranquil town, every dawn that a flag is unfurled, every moment that an american enjoys life, liberty and the pursuit of hab byness, that is their legacy. >> reporter: as the president told the stories of the fallen, family and friends across the nation gathered to watch and grief. >> michael cahill. >> reporter: in washington, michelle, the sister of michael cahill, watched in abject sorrow. >> you see the wars over there, across the ocean, and now it's just -- it's right here in our own backyard. >> michael pearson loved his family and loved his music and his goal was to be a music teacher. >> reporter: in illinois, those closest to michael pearson were feeling the loss. >> reporter: kham xiong came to america from thailand. >>
who grew up in ni r nigeria and qualified in the united states. he was working as medical examiner in pittsburgh. >> there was a commotion. everyone was excited. >> he performed the autopsy, confirming that mike webster died of a heart attack. >> however, a question kept coming in my mind. the heart attack cannot explain his life after football. i had to provide an explanation for that. so i took out -- i was extremely disappointed when i opened up his skull and his brain looked formal. it looked like a perfect text book picture of a normal brain. >> determined to find answers, he continued studying mike webster's brain, and a whole new scientific account began to unravel. he said he found a new medical condition. chronic traumatic ensef alepathy. >> we're looking at a microscopic slide at a microscopic picture of the brain of a normal individual, about 40 years old. it looks very beautiful, attractive. the same region of the brain in a football player, about 40 years old. >> wow. >> you can see a difference. you don't have to be a brain expert to notice the difference. what you ca
of the largest first class customers for the united states postal service. >> reporter: are you carrying it for us? >> just a good customer. >> reporter: well, for now anyway, because some day, and it has begun already, most, if not all of netflix customers will be getting their movies not by mail, but over the internet. do we see a day when netflix is all about direct streaming into your home and the dvd is totally out of the picture? >> not for a long time. years and years. we think our ds through the mail business will continue to grow for five to ten years. >> dvds today are so -- people have them in their car, they have portable dvd players, they are in every pc. they are just incredibly useful. >> reporter: and so it is still an ocean of dvds. and we wondered, where in that ocean was the disc we had mailed the night before? well, this told us it had already arrived back at netflix, e-mail sent to our producer at 6:16 a.m. confirming netflix had it. but where was it now among these hundreds of thousands of discs flying in and out the door. could netflix's system find it? >> there is
of the united states of america, is a broken woman. or was a broken woman. and i don't think i was a broken woman. i did what i had to do, and came back and right into a company that had not failed, despite the wishes of some that it would. >> reporter: was it humiliating? >> no. >> reporter: no? >> no. i was never humiliated. i was hurt. and i was sad. but i was never, never broken. >> reporter: and now, she is determined. her company will not be broken, either. if anyone can do it, she can. >>> when we come back, they are a delightful treat, but is the cupcake bubble about to burst? it's tonight's "sign of the times." jeep. owing reality isn't captured by a hidden camera. it doesn't come in episodes either. you see i don't live to live through anyone ever. so while everyone waits to see the next best this or an unbelievable th here's the reality. there's no rerun when your living in the now. so while you tune in i'll be somewhere getting out. i live. i ride. i am. jeep. uh... yeah? you gonna ask him this time? about what? our erectile dysfunction. shh...no...i don't want to talk about it.
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)